Informações sobre o curso
4.6
121 classificações
22 avaliações
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100% online

Comece imediatamente e aprenda em seu próprio cronograma.
Prazos flexíveis

Prazos flexíveis

Redefinir os prazos de acordo com sua programação.
Nível iniciante

Nível iniciante

Horas para completar

Aprox. 10 horas para completar

Sugerido: 7 hours/week...
Idiomas disponíveis

Inglês

Legendas: Inglês, Italiano, Espanhol, Portuguese (Brazilian), Chinês (simplificado)
100% online

100% online

Comece imediatamente e aprenda em seu próprio cronograma.
Prazos flexíveis

Prazos flexíveis

Redefinir os prazos de acordo com sua programação.
Nível iniciante

Nível iniciante

Horas para completar

Aprox. 10 horas para completar

Sugerido: 7 hours/week...
Idiomas disponíveis

Inglês

Legendas: Inglês, Italiano, Espanhol, Portuguese (Brazilian), Chinês (simplificado)

Programa - O que você aprenderá com este curso

Semana
1
Horas para completar
15 minutos para concluir

Welcome to the Course

Welcome to Think Again: How to Avoid Fallacies! This course is the fourth in a series of four courses jointly titled Think Again: How to Reason and Argue. We are excited that you are taking this course, and we hope that you will take all four courses in the series, because there is a great deal of important material to learn. In the series as a whole, you learn how to analyze and evaluate arguments and how to avoid common mistakes in reasoning. These important skills will be useful to you in deciding what to believe and what to do in all areas of your life. We encounter fallacies almost everywhere we look. Politicians, salespeople, and children commonly use fallacies in order to get us to think what they want us to think. Think Again: How to Avoid Fallacies will show how to identify and avoid many of the fallacies that people use to get us to think the way they want us to think. The first part of this course introduces the series and the course. It also clarifies some peculiarities you may find with this course. We encourage you to watch the "Introduction to the Course" video first as it will help you learn more from the materials that come later....
Reading
1 video (Total 5 min), 1 leitura
Video1 vídeos
Reading1 leituras
Course Logistics (Start Here)10min
Horas para completar
3 horas para concluir

Fallacies of Unclarity

CONTENT: In this week's material we will describes two phenomena that are both common and useful in the languages that human beings speak, but both of which give rise to the potential for fallacious reasoning. A word or phrase is vague when its meaning is not precise, and it is ambiguous when it has more than one meaning. When we use vague or ambiguous phrases in our reasoning, it is very easy for us to make a number of different kinds of fallacies. This week will teach you what these different kinds of fallacies are, and give us some practice in spotting them, so you can make sure to avoid them in the future. LEARNING OUTCOMES : By the end of this week's material you will be able to: define what a fallacy is distinguish various kinds of fallacies understand the linguistic phenomena that give rise to fallacies identify various kinds of slippery slop fallacies where they occur identify various kinds of fallacies of equivocation where they occur OPTIONAL READING: If you want more examples or more detailed discussions of the fallacies that result from vaguness or ambiguity, we recommend Understanding Arguments, Ninth Edition, Chapters 13-14....
Reading
9 videos (Total 71 min), 7 testes
Video9 videos
Argument from the Heap7min
Vagueness8min
Conceptual Slippery Slopes6min
Fairness Slippery Slopes6min
Causal Slippery Slopes6min
Ambiguity8min
Semantic and Syntactic Ambiguity13min
Fallacies of Equivocation6min
Quiz7 exercícios práticos
Introduction to Fallacies2min
Vagueness10min
Slippery Slopes6min
Fairness Slippery Slopes6min
Causal Slippery Slopes6min
Semantic and Syntactic Ambiguity8min
Fallacies of Equivocation20min
Semana
2
Horas para completar
2 horas para concluir

Fallacies of Relevance

CONTENT: This week describes two of the most common fallacies that people make: ad hominem fallacies and appeals to authority. Part of what makes these fallacies so common, and so difficult to avoid, is that many ad hominem arguments, and many appeals to authority, are actually not fallacies at all! Only some of them are. And figuring out which of them are fallacies is more of an art than a science. There is no simple recipe, but there are some rules of thumb you can use. We hope that the practice that you get in this week will help you to improve your skills at distinguish the fallacious from the non-fallacious instances of ad hominem reasoning, as well as appeal to authority. LEARNING OUTCOMES: By the end of this section you will be able to: determine whether an ad hominem argument is a fallacy determine whether an appeal to authority is a fallacy OPTIONAL READING: If you want more examples or more detailed discussions of these topics, we recommend Understanding Arguments, Ninth Edition, Chapter 15....
Reading
10 videos (Total 68 min), 5 testes
Video10 videos
Fallacies of Relevance: Ad Hominem8min
Silencers10min
Dismissers6min
Deniers6min
Appeals to Authority6min
Amplifiers4min
Supporters4min
Affirmers5min
Appeals to Popular Opinion3min
Quiz5 exercícios práticos
Dismissers6min
Deniers6min
Supporters6min
Affirmers12min
Appeals to Popular Opinion10min
Horas para completar
1 hora para concluir

Fallacies of Vacuity and Circularity

CONTENT: Now we will describe another common set of fallacies: fallacies that occur when an argument makes no progress from its premises to its conclusion. Sometimes, arguments make no progress because the conclusion is already contained in the premises. Sometimes, arguments make no progress because the conclusion is presupposed by the premises. And sometimes, arguments make no progress because the premises don’t make any claim at all, even if they might sound like they do. When you know how to identify such fallacies, you will find that they are more common than you think! LEARNING OUTCOMES: By the end of this section you will be able to: identify various kinds of circularity or vacuity where they occur OPTIONAL READING: If you want more examples or more detailed discussions of these topics, we recommend Understanding Arguments,Ninth Edition, Chapter 16....
Reading
3 videos (Total 17 min), 3 testes
Video3 videos
Circularity and Begging the Question4min
Self-Sealers8min
Quiz3 exercícios práticos
Fallacies of Vacuity10min
Circularity and Begging the Question12min
Self-Sealers6min
Semana
3
Horas para completar
3 horas para concluir

Refutation: Its Varieties and PItfalls

CONTENT: This week we will teach you various strategies for refuting a fallacious argument. To refute an argument is to show that the argument is unsuccessful. Even if you are able to identify a fallacious argument as a fallacy, you might still not be able to prove to others that it is a fallacy. In this week, you will learn a variety of techniques for proving to others that the argument is a fallacy. LEARNING OUTCOMES: By the end of this week you will be able to: refute fallacious arguments OPTIONAL READING: If you want more examples or more detailed discussions of these topics, we recommend Understanding Arguments, Ninth Edition, Chapter 17....
Reading
7 videos (Total 71 min), 4 testes
Video7 videos
Refutation by Parallel Reasoning11min
False Dichotomy16min
Reductio Ad Absurdum7min
Counterexamples10min
Attacking a Straw Man12min
Why Walter Should Shave His Head6min
Quiz4 exercícios práticos
Refutation by Parallel Reasoning22min
Counterexamples12min
Reductio Ad Absurdum14min
Attacking a Straw Man12min
Semana
4
Horas para completar
1 hora para concluir

Catch-Up and Final Quiz

This week gives you time to catch up and review, because we realize that the previous weeks include a great deal of challenging material. It will also be provide enough time to take the final quiz as often as you want, with different questions each time. We explain the answers in each exam so that you can learn more and do better when you try the exam again. You may take the quiz as many times as you want in order to learn more and do better, with different questions each time. You will be able to retake the quiz three times every eight hours. You might not need to take more than one version of the exam if you do well enough on your first try. That is up to you. However many versions you take, we hope that all of the exams will provide additional learning experiences....
Reading
1 video (Total 5 min), 1 teste
Video1 vídeos
Quiz1 exercício prático
Final Exammin
4.6
22 avaliaçõesChevron Right
Benefício de carreira

83%

consegui um benefício significativo de carreira com este curso

Melhores avaliações

por CKMay 30th 2017

This course will be immensely helpful in structuring my thoughts in a logical and manner by addressing pertinent material and avoiding fallacy traps. Thank you so much!!!

por NNMay 1st 2017

This was a nice course. Covers many fallacies in detail. Practice exercises are good. More fallacies could have been covered though. Overall, I did love the course.

Instrutores

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Dr. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong

Professor
Philosophy
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Dr. Ram Neta

Professor
Philosophy

Sobre Duke University

Duke University has about 13,000 undergraduate and graduate students and a world-class faculty helping to expand the frontiers of knowledge. The university has a strong commitment to applying knowledge in service to society, both near its North Carolina campus and around the world....

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