Created by:  University of Pennsylvania

  • David P. Silverman

    Taught by:  David P. Silverman, Eckley Brinton Coxe, Jr. Professor of Egyptology

    Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
LevelIntermediate
Language
English
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings
4.5 stars
Average User Rating 4.5See what learners said
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Coursework
Coursework

Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

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Creators
University of Pennsylvania
The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn) is a private university, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. A member of the Ivy League, Penn is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States, and considers itself to be the first university in the United States with both undergraduate and graduate studies.
Ratings and Reviews
Rated 4.5 out of 5 of 531 ratings

Good information, organized in an interesting and unique way. The graphics and labeling are beautiful.

The course is flawed, however, by the way the professor is obviously reading a script from a teleprompter. His delivery is uncomfortably slow. and. Awkward. withunatural. pauses. In. hisspeech. I wish he would just talk! He seems knowledgeable but his passion for the the subject is ruined by the stilted speech. My favorite video was the last one, where he and a lab technician are in a restoration lab, and the two of them are just talking. If the entire course had been that way, it would be a 5-star winner.

This course presents an excellent introduction for ancient Egypt. For the beginners like me, it can't be better. Thanks!

Very interesting and informative

Excellent diversion from contemporary ordeals and a joy to consider how much our society shares in common with ancient Egypt.

Thanks much!