Informações sobre o curso
4.8
42 classificações
7 avaliações
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Comece imediatamente e aprenda em seu próprio cronograma.
Prazos flexíveis

Prazos flexíveis

Redefinir os prazos de acordo com sua programação.
Nível iniciante

Nível iniciante

Horas para completar

Aprox. 13 horas para completar

Sugerido: 2-3 hours of study per week ...
Idiomas disponíveis

Inglês

Legendas: Inglês...
100% online

100% online

Comece imediatamente e aprenda em seu próprio cronograma.
Prazos flexíveis

Prazos flexíveis

Redefinir os prazos de acordo com sua programação.
Nível iniciante

Nível iniciante

Horas para completar

Aprox. 13 horas para completar

Sugerido: 2-3 hours of study per week ...
Idiomas disponíveis

Inglês

Legendas: Inglês...

Programa - O que você aprenderá com este curso

Semana
1
Horas para completar
4 horas para concluir

Starting to write: Understanding definitions of identity

This week, we will consider practical aspects of academic writing, such as structure and the importance of defining key terms in an essay. The term we will focus on this week is identity. After hearing Kath Woodward’s ideas on identity, our three student writers, Ada, Ziggy, and Joey will write their own definitions of identity. Emphasising that writing is a process, we will give feedback on the students writers’ definitions. We will then provide you with the opportunity to draft your definition of identity, give feedback to other learners and receive feedback from them....
Reading
10 vídeos (Total de 59 min), 5 leituras, 4 testes
Video10 videos
Thinking about your essay6min
Meet our student writers5min
Through the looking glass: Who am I?5min
Woodward on identity: I, me and the world11min
Woodward on identity: Roots and routes12min
How do definitions work?3min
Definitions in context3min
Drafting your definition1min
Giving feedback on definitions4min
Reading5 leituras
How this course works10min
Meet your instructors5min
Week 1: What to expect10min
Summary of Woodward's interview10min
Week 1 recommended readings10min
Quiz3 exercícios práticos
Is this course right for you?20min
Woodward Practice Quiz6min
Week 1 Graded Quiz8min
Semana
2
Horas para completar
3 horas para concluir

Developing an argument: shifting identities

Week 2 further develops the concept of identity by considering the effects of mobility on one’s identity. Throughout history, as individuals moved across borders, they were either welcomed or perceived as an outsider or a threat. In South Africa during Apartheid, people within the country were further separated into ‘homelands’, and those who challenged the boundaries such as Nelson Mandela were labelled as criminals and terrorists. To help you formulate ideas on such concepts in your essay, we now consider the features of a good academic essay focusing on the introduction. We also introduce a three-part strategy to approach your readings: preview, overview and inview. The task for this week is drafting an introduction at university level. We identify key features of an introduction, then look at introductions written by our three student writers, and provide them with constructive feedback....
Reading
10 vídeos (Total de 51 min), 3 leituras, 4 testes
Video10 videos
Identity and mobility through the ages3min
Nelson Mandela: Terrorist or freedom fighter?3min
Reading strategies6min
Applying reading strategies: Sichone’s chapter4min
Applying reading strategies: Blommaert’s chapter7min
Understanding the course essay4min
Drafting your introduction6min
Giving feedback on introductions9min
Relationship between the introduction and conclusion2min
Reading3 leituras
Week 2: What to expect10min
Required reading - Xenophobia by Owen Sichone10min
Required reading - Discourse by Blommaert10min
Quiz3 exercícios práticos
Sichone and Blommaert practice quiz4min
Week 2 practice quiz12min
Critique an introduction quiz10min
Semana
3
Horas para completar
4 horas para concluir

Supporting the argument: situating identity within culture

This week begins with a discussion of culture and its relevance when individuals become mobile, moving between geographical and social contexts. We look at a case study of a student from the United Kingdom who comes to Johannesburg, South Africa. The case study helps us to think about who owns culture and how different or similar we are across contexts. Next, we consider Thornton’s arguments about culture. He argues against the view that there are many cultures and notes that there is only culture. Thornton considers culture as a resource to which people have different degrees of access. Some examples of cultural resources are clothes, money, beliefs, ideas. Individuals draw on these to construct their identity, but unequal access to these resources that are valued gives some people more possibilities to construct identities that are dominant and more valued. This creates a semblance of difference between groups of people. As people move across borders, these differences may become heightened, because some of the cultural resources that an individual carries with her, may cease to be relevant or may be seen as threatening. So, when supporting one’s argument about what happens to identity as individuals move across borders, it is important to delve into culture and how culture creates differences, how it may accentuate boundaries, and how these may or may not impact on identity. Writing paragraphs in support of one’s argument requires close attention to how the paragraphs link with the position, and with other ideas across the paragraphs. Hence, we offer practical guidelines on paragraphing, coherence and cohesion. We give an example of a well-written paragraph and analyse its form to see why it is good. We then review paragraphs submitted by our three student writers and note what is strong and what could be improved in each. We introduce the core aspects of referencing in essays. We also explain why referencing is an important part of academic writing when we are referring to different people’s views (or voices) and distinguishing these from our own. ...
Reading
12 vídeos (Total de 62 min), 3 leituras, 4 testes
Video12 videos
Case study of an international student1min
Pool of abundance: Understanding culture6min
Round table discussion on culture13min
Writing paragraphs3min
Quotes and paraphrasing3min
In-text referencing4min
Coherence and cohesion3min
Student writers drafting their paragraphs8min
Giving feedback on Ada’s paragraph5min
Giving feedback on Ziggy’s paragraph5min
Giving feedback on Joey's paragraphs3min
Reading3 leituras
Week 3: What to expect10min
Required reading: Culture: A contemporary definition by Thornton10min
Cohesive devices - Linking words10min
Quiz3 exercícios práticos
Thornton Quiz8min
Week 3 practice quiz8min
Paragraph development quiz12min
Semana
4
Horas para completar
3 horas para concluir

Starting to finish: writing the first draft

This week we sum up the ground we have covered in this course. The week is about crafting your final essay draft. We recap the building blocks of writing an academic essay, relooking at the features of an introduction, body, conclusion and the purposes of cohesion, coherence and referencing. We also consider and provide engaged feedback on the draft essays written by our three virtual students. There is detailed feedback on the strengths, improvements and opportunities for further improvement on the essays. The feedback is aligned with the core skills introduced in the course, such as writing the topic sentence, linking sentences and ensuring coherence and cohesion. Thereafter we sum up the course with a discussion on the ideas of the four thinkers you were introduced to in this course, namely Woodward, Sichone, Blommaert and Thornton. ...
Reading
8 vídeos (Total de 46 min), 1 leitura, 3 testes
Video8 videos
Round table discussion: Reflection on the readings14min
The essay building blocks5min
Referencing and managing sources5min
Giving feedback on Ziggy's draft7min
Giving feedback on Joey's draft3min
Giving feedback on Ada's draft3min
Looking forward2min
Reading1 leituras
Week 4: What to expect10min
Quiz2 exercícios práticos
Week 4 practice quiz6min
Critique an essay12min
4.8
7 avaliaçõesChevron Right

Melhores avaliações

por APSep 4th 2018

The Corsera program really help me to acquire new skills for essay writing and to develop a sense of responsibility and regularity in my work. Thank you Corsera :)

por RWMay 31st 2018

it was very helpful with my writing skills my essay marks improved as I was able to apply what I learnt from the mooc

Instrutores

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Gideon Nomdo

Lecturer
Centre for Higher Education Development
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Aditi Hunma

Lecturer
Centre for Higher Education Development

Sobre University of Cape Town

The University of Cape Town is the oldest university in South Africa and is one of the leading research universities on the African continent. UCT has over 25 000 students, of whom 30% are postgraduate students. We offer degrees in six faculties: Commerce, Engineering & the Built Environment, Health Sciences, Humanities, Law, and Science. We pride ourself on our diverse student body, which reflects the many cultures and backgrounds of the region. We welcome international students and are currently home to thousands of international students from over 100 countries. UCT has a tradition of academic excellence that is respected world-wide and is privileged to have more than 30 A-rated researchers on our staff, all of whom are recognised as world leaders in their field. Our aim is to ensure that our research contributes to the public good through sharing knowledge for the benefit of society. Past students include five Nobel Laureates – Max Theiler, Alan Cormack, Sir Aaron Klug, Ralph Bunche and, most recently, J M Coetzee....

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